Tagged as: 24 Hour Fitness

How Icelandic Fitness is preparing for the Coronavirus Reopening

How Icelandic Fitness is preparing for the Coronavirus Reopening

 

At Icelandic Fitness and Recovery, cleanliness has always been a top priority, long before Coronavirus.  Just like you, we don’t want to spend our time in a germ filled gym, and as small business owners, we spend more time there than anybody.  As we get ready to welcome our trainers and clients back into our facility, we want to assure you that we are doubling down on our already extreme cleaning measures, not only keep you safe and healthy, but us as well.  Keep in mind, we are in position to open as soon as the stay-at-home order is lifted, due to the fact that even before Coronavirus concerns, we were already practicing safe social distancing, limiting the number of people allowed in our facility, and asking sick clients to stay home.

Our increased cleaning measures include:

  • Disinfecting after each use. (spraying and wiping down weights, equipment and handles after each client touches them).
  • Client and Trainer Temperature checks
  • Nightly professional deep cleaning
  • Ozone and UV cleaning
  • Fresh Air into gym daily
  • Disinfecting after each hyperbaric session (pillow case, mattress cover, ozone, and disinfectant)
  • Social Distancing
  • No more than 10 people in the facility, including trainers

 

Sincerely,

Team Icelandic Fitness (Jason Stone, Jamie White, Yata Williams, Andy Marchase, Matt Luckie, Marisa and Mike Pastor, Matt McKay, and Dr. John Paul Krueger)

 

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery - Denver, Colorado

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery – Denver, Colorado

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery - Denver, Colorado

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery – Denver, Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ozone Cleaner

Ozone Cleaner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Are you using your Peloton the right way?

I thought I was. I remember when I first bought it, I was so excited to have a cycle instructor lead me through the vigorous workouts. I was sweating my butt off, out of breath and thoroughly whipped. I was initially rewarded for my hard work. I noticed after about 8 weeks of rigorous, daily cycling, I lost some of the back fat I had gained with my 2nd pregnancy at 42 years old. I was so excited because nothing was working on that stubborn back fat. But then, I noticed my weight loss was leveling off. I tried longer classes. Harder classes. Hill climbs, HIIT, even Tabata–still, I was maintaining, not losing. It reminded me of, 20 years ago, when I used to run for miles and miles with no noticeable results. I started running more and more, but I was gaining weight not losing. It wasn’t until 2005, when I met Jason Stone of Icelandic Fitness and Recovery, and Denver Golf Performance (and in 2007, married him), and he introduced weight training into my workouts –that I started seeing noticeable results. Back then, flabby arms and saddlebags were my biggest issues.

That was an Aha! moment for me with my Peloton, and luckily around the same I started plateauing with cycling (2018), Peloton introduced boot camps, and strength training. I started doing one day of cycling, the next day a combo of running and strength (a warmup run, followed by 30 minutes of weights), then the next day –a 45 minute bootcamp, which is 1/2 running, 1/2 strength, the next day–cycling again, and so on and so on.  That’s when my Peloton workouts really started paying off. I lost 8 pounds from where I really needed it most–my back fat and tummy.

I really think taking advantage of the variety of workouts Peloton offers is the key to using it the “right way,” especially if you are over 40 and battling the middle weight, as so many of us women do. I am about to turn 49, and I’m feeling better about my body than I have in a long time.

 

Heidi Hemmat

 

Heidi Hemmat 2019

Heidi Hemmat 2019

Heidi Hemmat 2017 before Peloton

Heidi Hemmat 2016 before Peloton, one year after the birth of my second child

Expert Neil Wolkodoff shares his research on the Effectiveness of Walking during Covid-19

Walking During Covid

With the COVID restrictions in place, and local gyms/facilities closed, people are walking outside. But are you getting the same workout that you would at your facility?

The answer is maybe, but likely not. Let’s look at the variables and data to make some sense of how to do outdoor walking to equal what you would do at the gym. Mentally, walking outside has psychological benefits, yet how you adjust the variables determines if you gain physical benefits and changes.

First, energy expenditure is based upon horizontal and vertical distance traveled. Go to Washington Park in Denver, the 2.5-mile loop is relatively flat, so you don’t get the extra benefit of walking up a hill. In general, when you add 1/10 of mph, that is going to have only 10-20% of the effect of adding a percent to the grade. The average person walking for 45 minutes for 3 miles at a flat will probably expend 300-375 kcal. Add 6% grade to the equation, and that number jumps to 550-594 kcal. That is quite a bit of difference with just a little bit of grade. Hills win from an energy expenditure perspective. So, if you were walking indoors on a treadmill at grade, you will either have to go faster or find hills to equal your gym workout.

Ideally, all forms of exercise should combine for an total expenditure of around 4,000 kcal per week. For most people a vigorous workout at the gym counts for 500 kcal per session. So, five days per week and you have quite a bit covered (2500 kcal). Combine with walking around the house or office more, and you can hit that 4K goal. This is the metric where health, fitness and weight maintenance combine.

As you get older, comfortable walking speed declines, which impacts energy burned. At age 30, it was probably 3.4 mph; at age 60, it is 2.6 mph. Most people are walking as couples or families, and that tends to take the speed down another notch or two. Since the goal is 30 minutes of walking per day according to the popular press is what many people are doing, they probably are not going fast enough as well as not long enough.

Another set of factors is muscle strength and the condition of your joints. The less power you have, especially in the legs, the more you slow down during your walk. Simply put, you can’t brake effectively in the de-acceleration phase when you land. The same is true for bad joints, whether it be knees, hips, or feet. People notice the joint (S) and do slow down accordingly.

 

The exercise bottom line is relatively simple. 30 minutes of walking is not going to be near as good as 30 minutes of treadmill walking at a grade.

Walking for 30 minutes is better than nothing. But don’t be fooled into thinking this is the same as 45 minutes of “cardio” at a brisk pace at your former facility. Add time or add grade to get closer to what you need!

 

Neil Wolkodoff

References

Cunha FA, Catalão RP, Midgley AW, Gurgel J, Porto F, Farinatti PT. Do the speeds defined by the American College of Sports Medicine metabolic equation for running produce target energy expenditures during isocaloric exercise bouts?. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012;112(8):3019–3026.

Franz JR, Kram R. The effects of grade and speed on leg muscle activations during walking. Gait Posture. 2012;35(1):143–147.

Hall C, Figueroa A, Fernhall B, Kanaley JA. Energy expenditure of walking and running: comparison with prediction equations. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004;36(12):2128–2134.

Horiuchi M, Endo J, Horiuchi Y, Abe D. Comparisons of energy cost and economical walking speed at various gradients in healthy, active younger and older adults. J Exerc Sci Fit. 2015;13(2):79–85.

Lam YY, Ravussin E. Analysis of energy metabolism in humans: A review of methodologies. Mol Metab. 2016;5(11):1057–1071.

Minetti AE, Moia C, Roi GS, Susta D, Ferretti G. Energy cost of walking and running at extreme uphill and downhill slopes. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2002;93(3):1039–1046.

Nagano, H., James, L., Sparrow, W.A. et al. Effects of walking-induced fatigue on gait function and tripping risks in older adults. J NeuroEngineering Rehabil 2014:(11), 155.

Roberts D, Hillstrom H, Kim JH. Instantaneous Metabolic Cost of Walking: Joint-Space Dynamic Model with Subject-Specific Heat Rate. PLoS One. 2016;11(12).

PS, walking the dog is barely good exercise for the dog. Don’t be fooled into thinking that qualifies as “cardio” exercise for you!