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Expert Neil Wolkodoff shares his research on the Effectiveness of Walking during Covid-19

Walking During Covid

With the COVID restrictions in place, and local gyms/facilities closed, people are walking outside. But are you getting the same workout that you would at your facility?

The answer is maybe, but likely not. Let’s look at the variables and data to make some sense of how to do outdoor walking to equal what you would do at the gym. Mentally, walking outside has psychological benefits, yet how you adjust the variables determines if you gain physical benefits and changes.

First, energy expenditure is based upon horizontal and vertical distance traveled. Go to Washington Park in Denver, the 2.5-mile loop is relatively flat, so you don’t get the extra benefit of walking up a hill. In general, when you add 1/10 of mph, that is going to have only 10-20% of the effect of adding a percent to the grade. The average person walking for 45 minutes for 3 miles at a flat will probably expend 300-375 kcal. Add 6% grade to the equation, and that number jumps to 550-594 kcal. That is quite a bit of difference with just a little bit of grade. Hills win from an energy expenditure perspective. So, if you were walking indoors on a treadmill at grade, you will either have to go faster or find hills to equal your gym workout.

Ideally, all forms of exercise should combine for an total expenditure of around 4,000 kcal per week. For most people a vigorous workout at the gym counts for 500 kcal per session. So, five days per week and you have quite a bit covered (2500 kcal). Combine with walking around the house or office more, and you can hit that 4K goal. This is the metric where health, fitness and weight maintenance combine.

As you get older, comfortable walking speed declines, which impacts energy burned. At age 30, it was probably 3.4 mph; at age 60, it is 2.6 mph. Most people are walking as couples or families, and that tends to take the speed down another notch or two. Since the goal is 30 minutes of walking per day according to the popular press is what many people are doing, they probably are not going fast enough as well as not long enough.

Another set of factors is muscle strength and the condition of your joints. The less power you have, especially in the legs, the more you slow down during your walk. Simply put, you can’t brake effectively in the de-acceleration phase when you land. The same is true for bad joints, whether it be knees, hips, or feet. People notice the joint (S) and do slow down accordingly.

 

The exercise bottom line is relatively simple. 30 minutes of walking is not going to be near as good as 30 minutes of treadmill walking at a grade.

Walking for 30 minutes is better than nothing. But don’t be fooled into thinking this is the same as 45 minutes of “cardio” at a brisk pace at your former facility. Add time or add grade to get closer to what you need!

 

Neil Wolkodoff

References

Cunha FA, Catalão RP, Midgley AW, Gurgel J, Porto F, Farinatti PT. Do the speeds defined by the American College of Sports Medicine metabolic equation for running produce target energy expenditures during isocaloric exercise bouts?. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012;112(8):3019–3026.

Franz JR, Kram R. The effects of grade and speed on leg muscle activations during walking. Gait Posture. 2012;35(1):143–147.

Hall C, Figueroa A, Fernhall B, Kanaley JA. Energy expenditure of walking and running: comparison with prediction equations. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004;36(12):2128–2134.

Horiuchi M, Endo J, Horiuchi Y, Abe D. Comparisons of energy cost and economical walking speed at various gradients in healthy, active younger and older adults. J Exerc Sci Fit. 2015;13(2):79–85.

Lam YY, Ravussin E. Analysis of energy metabolism in humans: A review of methodologies. Mol Metab. 2016;5(11):1057–1071.

Minetti AE, Moia C, Roi GS, Susta D, Ferretti G. Energy cost of walking and running at extreme uphill and downhill slopes. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2002;93(3):1039–1046.

Nagano, H., James, L., Sparrow, W.A. et al. Effects of walking-induced fatigue on gait function and tripping risks in older adults. J NeuroEngineering Rehabil 2014:(11), 155.

Roberts D, Hillstrom H, Kim JH. Instantaneous Metabolic Cost of Walking: Joint-Space Dynamic Model with Subject-Specific Heat Rate. PLoS One. 2016;11(12).

PS, walking the dog is barely good exercise for the dog. Don’t be fooled into thinking that qualifies as “cardio” exercise for you!

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery Free Resources during the Covid-19 Virus

Free At Home and Mobile Delivery Options from Icelandic Fitness

 

We are providing free online training and other options for all of our members and non-members at Icelandic Fitness.  Below is a list of options to help out when everyone is going stir crazy at home.

 

Delivery Service Golf Lessons with Trackman and Coach Jamie White of Denver Golf Performance (DGP)

http://www.denvergolfperformance.com/trackman-home-delivery-for-practice/

Mobile Trackman

Coach Jamie White and his mobile Trackman setup

Wednesday’s Weekly Zoom yoga sessions with coach Mike Miller

Zoom meeting site is 652-132-7698 and 762-692-641

6pm Mountain Time

 

Free Daily online Facebook workouts with coach Mike Pastor and his wife Marisa Hughes at 6am

https://www.facebook.com/CoachMikePastor/

 

 

 

 

 

Independent Contractor Gym Rental for Trainers in Denver Metro

Gym Rental Space in Denver for Independent Contractors

 

We are offering our beautiful new gym to any trainer in the Denver Metro area that operates as an independent contractor.  We currently have room for one more trainer that is either full time or part time.  The Icelandic Fitness gym is busier during the morning hours of around 5am-12pm, but is pretty much wide open from around 2pm-10pm and weekends.  The only thing we need is liability insurance and proof of certification.  One of the perks working at Icelandic Fitness is all trainers can use our recovery facilities (Infrared Sauna, Normatec Boots, Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber) and Trackman Golf hitting bay when available.

Contact Jason Stone 303-641-8149 or jasonstonefitness@gmail.com

Gym Rental Rates:

Person Session – $25 per hour

Part Time $750 a month (Under 50 hours per month)

Full Time Trainer $1500 (Over 75 hours a month)

 

Icelandic Fitness

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery

Icelandic Fitness

Icelandic Fitness and Recovery

 

Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber

Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber (HBOT)

Trainers in the Denver Metro Area, Glendale, Cherry Creek, Aurora, Golden, Lakewood, DTC, Denver Tech Center, Highlands Ranch, Thornton, Boulder

Trainers leaving Lifetime Athletic Club (Cherry Creek), (formerly Cherry Creek Athletic Club) Pura Vida, 24 Hour Fitness, Chuze, Anytime Fitness, Orange Theory, Crossfit Gyms, Soul Cycle

Whoop and HRV (Heart Rate Variability)

What the heck is HRV and why should I care?

A little over a month ago I started doing some extensive research on the buzz word of fitness training in 2019, HRV or heart rate variability.  There are a lot of devices on the market that say they measure HRV and at the time I had one, the series 4 Apple Watch.  I was disappointed in what the capabilities of the Apple Watch could do in regards to the HRV measurement.  I noticed the HRV measurements were consistently all over the place and taken at different times during the day.   Frustrated with this important fitness reading I pulled the trigger on the WHOOP 3.0 device.

Whoop 3.0

Whoop 3.0

Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of your autonomic nervous system and is widely considered one of the best objective performance measurements for physical fitness and determining your body’s recovery.  Scientifically HRV is the changes or variations that occur between successive heartbeats.  The variability between heartbeats acts as a proxy for assessing an athletes autonomic nervous system function, and in particular the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

 

Things that affect HRV

  • Sleep Quality
  • Hydration Levels
  • Prescription Drugs
  • Alcohol and Caffeine
  • Age
  • Exercise
  • Stress

 

 

 

Minding Your P’s and Double Q’s

By now, you’ve probably heard of COQ-10 and what the supplement can do- boosting energy, speeding recovery, and helping to reduce the effects of certain medicines on your heart, muscles, and other organs. Well, one of the newer supplements on the block is PQQ-10, which some consider the “fountain of youth” for your cells.

pqqsupplement

PQQ-10 – its scientific name, Pyrroloquinoline quinone – is actually a compound found in plant foods. And, while it’s not currently thought of as a vitamin, some experts believe it could be considered an essential nutrient in the not too distant future.

 

So, what does it do? PQQ helps grow and develop cells and is an extremely powerful

antioxidant. Research shows that it plays a critical role in nutrition. And, when it’s deliberately omitted from diets in mammals, it impairs growth, compromises immune systems and interferes with the ability to reproduce.

 

But, what’s considered the most important function of PQQ is what it does to key enzymes involved in producing energy in our cells – called the mitochondria. PQQ not only improves energy production, it promotes the spontaneous generation of new mitochondria within aging cells – and that’s where it gets credit as being a “fountain of youth” – at least, for your cells.

energy_mitochondria

The benefits of PQQ revolve around what it can potentially do for (or block) what happens to us as we age- Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease, and many other chronic degenerative illnesses. The current research on PQQ has mostly focused on its ability to protect memory and cognition in both aging animals and humans.

 

In animal studies, PQQ has been shown to:

  • reverse cognitive impairment caused by chronic stress and improve performance on memory tests
  • protect brain cells against damage
  • protect against the likelihood of severe stroke
  • prevent the development of a protein associated with Parkinson’s disease
  • protect nerve cells from a protein linked with Alzheimer’s disease

 

PQQ is sort of anti-aging armor for our most energy-intensive organs – the brain and the heart. And, it’s been shown to optimize health and function of the entire central nervous system.

 

So how much and how often? Well- the current recommendation of 10 to 20 mg of PQQ daily is mostly based on what researchers have seen in animal studies. For humans, studies have shown that 20 mg per day of PQQ resulted in improvements on tests of higher cognitive function in a group of middle-aged and elderly people. But, get this – the effects were even more significant when the test subjects also took 300 mg per day of CoQ10.

 

So, the bottom-line? Minding your P’s and Q’s may just help you (and your cells) have a longer and more productive life.

 

Jason Stone

Icelandic Fitness